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2017 Health Care Reform Bills

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2017 Health Care Reform Bills

This page provides information on the four major health care reform bills that have been introduced in the 115th session.

The American Health Care Act (H.R. 1628) (read the text)

Introduced:     3/20/2017 by the House Committee on the Budget 
Passed:     5/4/2017 passed the House (217-213)
Current Status:     7/27/2017 failed in the Senate (as amended)

 

The Better Care Reconciliation Act (read the text)

Introduced:     7/25/2017 by Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) (as an amendment offered during Senate consideration of HR 1628)
Current Status:     7/25/2017 failed in the Senate (43-57)

 

The Obamacare Repeal Reconciliation Act (read the text)

Introduced:     7/26/2017 by Rand Paul (R-KY) (as an amendment offered during Senate consideration of HR 1628)
Curent Status:     7/26/2017 failed in the Senate (45-55)

 

The Health Care Freedom Act (read the text)

Introduced:     7/27/2017 by Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) (as an amendment offered during Senate consideration of HR 1628)
Current Status:     7/28/2017 failed in the Senate (49-51)

 

What these bills do:

This infographic compares the first three plans, which have in common deep cuts to the Medicaid program, cost shifting to states, and elimination of the Community First Choice Option authorized under Section 1915(k). The AHCA and the BCRA would have changed the Medicaid funding structure to one of per capita caps with a fixed growth rate based on either the Consumer Price Index (CPI) for Urban markets or the CPI for Medical costs. The HCFA, also called the "skinny repeal" would have repealed the individual and employer mandate and certain ACA taxes in place, but would not have made structural changes to Medicaid or roll back the expansion. 

What they mean for providers:

All versions of health care reform that have been put forth thus far would have had devastating consequences for providers who are reimbursed through the Medicaid program. Deep overall funding cuts though the imposition of a per capita caps structure and a fixed growth rate that would not keep up with costs would have worsened a system that is already chronically underfunded. 

ANCOR's Position:

ANCOR strongly opposed each of these bills.